Delayed diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome

Victoria Nicholls nichollsvi2 at GMAIL.COM
Sat Dec 3 16:28:15 UTC 2016


Good morning,

I can answer that: because the only thing that matters to ob/gyn's who
diagnose & treat it (usually) ONLY care about doing so if you are
going to get pregnant. If you aren't, take some BCP and go.

Flat out, I was in a local PCOS support group, helped out a national
PCOS support group and the message was the same across many women in
America. If you are getting pregnant, we care, otherwise don't bother
us.

Harsh reality.

Vic


On Sat, Dec 3, 2016 at 8:06 AM, Mark Graber <graber.mark at gmail.com> wrote:
> This is a just-released report that surveyed patients in an international registry about their diagnosis of PCOS.  We will be seeing a lot more patient-reported outcomes data in the future, and this study is an interesting demonstration of both its power and its limitations.  Over a third of women reported over a 2-year delay in establishing the diagnosis, but the variability in time-to-diagnosis was large.  We need studies like this to begin understanding what timeliness means.  Next step - exploring why the diagnosis was established expeditiously for many patients, and so slowly for many others.
>
> Mark L. Graber MD FACP
> President, Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine
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> Moderator: David Meyers, Board Member, Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine
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Moderator: David Meyers, Board Member, Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine




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