Do you know enough to know what you don't know?

ROBERT M BELL rmsbell200 at YAHOO.COM
Tue Jul 17 20:57:07 UTC 2018


Thank you Susan,

That is also necessary, but why do we not learn from other industries and try and learn a little bit more to reduce the error rate. 

Overall the diagnostic process is like a test with poor specificity and sensitivity and we move everything to improve those figures. Do we do that well in our medical training? Do we focus on our own individual error rates? Should we all get 90% in any tests/exam?

Can anyone tell me why, in our training, we have not moved to the equivalent of flight simulators in the airline industry?

Repetition, and making errors in simulators is, I think, likely to be the best way to learn. 

http://www.flyaeroguard.com/discover/?gclid=CjwKCAjwp7baBRBIEiwAPtjwxMUWJKsP4H7yMwCf194raocDekvbdJ4pfTWpT71AUpk4fuJF163cHBoCViMQAvD_BwE <http://www.flyaeroguard.com/discover/?gclid=CjwKCAjwp7baBRBIEiwAPtjwxMUWJKsP4H7yMwCf194raocDekvbdJ4pfTWpT71AUpk4fuJF163cHBoCViMQAvD_BwE>

This flight program is just 225 hours of basic training. And they use advanced simulators.

Have History, Physical, Differential Diagnosis simulators been well tried.? Do they not work in medicine? 

Are medical exams better that simulators or simulators better that exams? One presumes simulators are, as good as or better than exams, in the aviation world.

Do we need the facts really drummed into us before we are let loose on patients?

Rob Bell, M.D.


> On Jul 17, 2018, at 11:18 AM, Susan Carr <000000100bc47bd7-dmarc-request at LIST.IMPROVEDIAGNOSIS.ORG> wrote:
> 
> The Dunning-Kruger Effect observes that you have to know *something* in order to appreciate what you don't know. I stumbled on this concept in an animated TEDEd lesson, which points out that "we all have knowledge gaps that prevent us from recognizing our errors" and leave us unlikely to ask for help. There's application here for diagnosis and pretty much all other human endeavors. Despite the snarky title—Why incompetent people think they're amazing—I find this oddly empowering… Knowing even a little is the gateway to learning more. Knowledge and awareness can lead to humility.
> 
> http://www.openculture.com/2017/12/why-incompetent-people-think-theyre-amazing.html
> 
> Do others find this helpful in the context of diagnosis?
> 
> Susan Carr
> Editor, ImproveDx
> Lunenburg MA
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Moderator: David Meyers, Board Member, Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine
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Moderator: David Meyers, Board Member, Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine


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